Volume 3 Issue 3

CONTENT LIST

  1. Impacts of sediment mining on the hydrochemistry and macrozoobenthos community in a coastal lagoon, Lagos, Nigeria
  2. Appraisal of surface water quality for irrigation collected from Sadar upazila of Jamalpur district, Bangladesh
  3. Effect of biofertilizer and weeding regimes on yield performance of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)
  4. Status of fish and shellfish diversity and their decline factors in the Rupsa River of Khulna in Bangladesh
  5. Performance of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) lines with different plantation time during rainy season
  6. Impact of nutrient management on the yield performance of some aromatic fine rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties in Boro season
  7. Contamination, enrichment and translocation of heavy metals in certain leafy vegetables grown in composite effluent irrigated soil
  8. A lack of response of irrigated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in rotation with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Mississippi Delta, USA
  9. Impact of bauxite mine to natural forest biomass and soil properties in Kas Island, Riau Island Province in Indonesia
  10. Effect of variety and spacing on the yield performance of maize (Zea mays L.) in old Brahmaputra floodplain area of Bangladesh
  11. Adding benefits to phytoremediation of sugar mill effluent by growing water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes): Evaluation of biomass for biogas production
  12. Combined allelopathic effect of buckwheat and marsh pepper residues on weed management and crop performance of transplant aman rice
  13. Genetic diversity analysis of some Bangladeshi aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L.) using simple sequence repeat markers (SSRM)
  14. Shelf life and quality of Sorboti lemon as affected by different chemicals and storage temperature
  15. Impact of integrated nutrient management on vegetative growth and flowering quality of gladiolus (Gladiolus hybridus Hort.) cv. American Beauty

Impacts of sediment mining on the hydrochemistry and macrozoobenthos community in a coastal lagoon, Lagos, Nigeria

 J.A. Nkwojiand S.I. Awodeyi
 Benthic Ecology and Hydrobiology Unit, Department of Marine Sciences, University of Lagos, Lagos, NIGERIA
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 17 July 2018; Revised received: 02 August 2018; Accepted: 12 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The water chemistry and macrozoobenthos assemblage of ten study stations in the Lagos lagoon were studied from December 2016 to May 2017 to assess the impacts of sediment mining on the water quality and the biological indices of the macrozoobenthos. Water and composite benthic samples were collected monthly at each study station and analysed in the laboratory following standard procedures. Except temperature, pH, TSS, salinity and conductivity showed no significant (P>0.05) difference, while the other parameters were not significantly (P<0.05) different among the stations. The sediment grain size analysis of the study area indicated the dominance of sand in sediment. This could be as a result of the dredging of the study area as Lagos lagoon is originally known to have muddy substratum. A total of 1,237 organisms belonging to 3 phyla, 4 classes, 10 families and 10 Species were recorded during the study period. Analysis of benthic community structure of the study area reveals a community dominated by mollusks, with the Bivalve, Aloides trigona contributing 54% and the gastropod, Pachymelania aurita contributing 33% of the total benthic fauna assemblage during the period of study. The fluctuations in the physicochemical parameters, sediments, and the composition, abundance and diversity of the macrobenthic fauna of the study area were largely influenced by the anthropogenic activities. In particular, stations with pronounced sediment mining activities recorded highly turbid water, changed substratum type and defaunisation.

Keywords: Coastal lagoon, Hydrochemistry, Macrozoobenthos, Sediment mining

Appraisal of surface water quality for irrigation collected from Sadar upazila of Jamalpur district, Bangladesh

Arifa Akter, H.M. Zakir*, Atiqur Rahman, Rumana Yesmeen and M.S. Rahman
Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agriculture, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202,
BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 14 August 2018; Revised received: 22 August 2018; Accepted: 26 August 2018

ABSTRACT
An attempt was made to assess surface water quality for irrigation collected from Sadar upazila of Jamalpur district, Bangladesh. Total 22 water samples were collected from the study area and analyzed for various physicochemical parameters following standard protocols at the Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. Major cation and anion chemistry showed their dominance in order of Ca > K > Na > Mg and HCO3 > Cl > SO4 > BO3 > PO4 > CO3, respectively. The study revealed that 18, 14 and 6 samples were unsuitable for irrigation in respect of HCO3, K and BO3 contents in water, respectively. Among the heavy metals, the concentration of Pb, Mn, Cd and Cu in water were comparatively higher than the standard limits, which makes 22, 14, 10 and 3 samples problematic for long term irrigation in the study area. Electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) reflected that surface water samples were low to very high salinity (C1-C4) and low alkalinity (S1) hazards classes. As regards to hardness, out of 22 water samples, 2 were very hard, 8 were hard, 11 were moderately hard and only one was soft in quality. The study results concluded that HCO3, BO3, K, Pb, Mn, Cd and Cu were the major contaminants in the surface water of Sadar upazila of Jamalpur district, Bangladesh. Finally, the study suggested that the surface water in this area needs to treat to minimize the amount of contaminants before use for irrigation.

Keywords: Bangladesh, Heavy metal, Irrigation, Jamalpur Sadar, Surface water quality

Effect of biofertilizer and weeding regimes on yield performance of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

F.M.J. Uddin*, Nazmul Hasan, Md. Rashedur Rahman and Md. Romij Uddin
Department of Agronomy, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh – 2202, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 12 June 2018; Revised received: 08 August 2018; Accepted: 18 August 2018

ABSTRACT
In order to assess the effect of biofertilizer and weeding regimes and their interaction on the performance of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a field experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Field Laboratory, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh following randomize complete block design (RCBD) with three replications during winter season, in 2017. The experiment consisted of five treatments of biofertilizer (B0 = no biofertilizer, B1 = 1.0 Kg biofertilizer ha-1, B2 = 1.5 Kg biofertilizer ha-1, B3 = 2.0 Kg biofertilizer ha-1, B4 = 2.5 Kg biofertilizer ha-1) and four level of weeding W0 = No weeding, W1 = One weeding at 15 DAS, W2 = Two weeding at 15 DAS and 30 DAS, W3 = Three weeding at 15 DAS, 30 DAS and 45 DAS. Yield contributing characters were significantly influenced by biofertilizer and weeding regimes. In case of attributes affected by yield factor for biofertilizer the highest plant height, weight of seed plant-1, grain and stover yield in 1.5 Kg biofertilizer ha-1, number of seed plant-1 in 1.0 Kg biofertilizer ha-1, weight of 1000 seeds in no biofertilizer  and harvest index in 2.0 Kg biofertilizer ha-1 treatments were observed. Considering yield attributes against weeding regimes, the highest plant height, grain yield, stover yield and harvest index in three weeding, weight of seeds plant-1 and weight of 1000 seeds in two weeding were found. In case of interaction effect highest plant height in B2W3, weight of seeds plant-1 in B4W2, weight of 1000 seeds in B1W3, grain yield in B3W3, stover yield in B3W3 and harvest index in B0W3 were observed. The results obtained in experiment indicate that there is ample scope to increase the yield of bush bean by applying proper dose of biofertilizer and management of weeding regimes.

Keywords: Bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), Biofertilizer, Weeding regimes, Yield

Status of fish and shellfish diversity and their decline factors in the Rupsa River of Khulna in Bangladesh

Sazzad Arefin1, Mrityunjoy Kunda1, Md. Jahidul Islam1, Debasish Pandit1* and Ahnaf Tausif Ul Haque2
1Department of Aquatic Resource Management, Sylhet Agricultural University, Sylhet-3100, BANGLADESH
2Department of Environmental Science and Management, North South University, Dhaka, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 13 August 2018; Revised received: 21 August 2018; Accepted: 26 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The study was aimed to find out the present status and causes of fish and shellfish diversity reduction in the Rupsa River of Bangladesh. Studies were conducted for a period of 6 months from July to December 2016. Focus group discussions (FGD), questionnaire interviews (QI) and key informant interviews (KII) were done to collect appropriate data from the local fishers and resource persons. A total of 62 species of fish and shellfish from 23 families were found in the river and 9 species disappeared in last 10 years. The species availability status was remarked in three categories and obtained as 14 species were commonly available, 28 species were moderately available and 20 species were rarely available. The highest percentage of fishes was catfishes (24.19%). There was a gradual reduction in the species diversity from previous 71 species to present 62 species with 12.68% declined by last 10 years. Average fish catch per fishermen per day reduced from 8.35 kg to 2.95 kg in last 10 years. Combined effects of some manmade and environmental factors are responsible for the loss of biodiversity. Majority of the respondents (90%) agreed that two manmade factors namely overfishing and navigation are mainly responsible for the loss of fish and shellfish diversity in the river followed by use of illegal fishing gears (86%), pollution (72.5%) and urbanization (64%). During the survey, 93.25% respondents reported water depth reduction as the main environmental factor followed by siltation and sedimentation (91%), temperature (61.75%) and turbidity (56%). The present work recommends preventing water pollution, maintaining fishing gears, increasing fishers’ awareness, implementing fisheries laws and establishing fish sanctuary to conserve finfish and shellfish diversity in the river. Moreover, counter and random surveys are also recommended to crosscheck the fishes’ status and decline causes for ensuring their proper management and conservation.

Keywords: Aquaculture, Biodiversity, Fishes and shellfishes, Population decline, Rupsa River

Performance of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) lines with different plantation time during rainy season

M. Ratna1, R. Sarker1*, Rumman Ara2, M.M. Hossain3 and M.M. Kamruzzaman4, 5
1Scientific Officer, Regional Horticultural Research Station, BARI, Patuakhali, BANGLADESH
2Scientific Officer, Spices Research Sub-centre, BARI, Faridpur, BANGLADESH
3Senior Scientific Officer, Regional Spices Research Centre, BARI, Gazipur, BANGLADESH
4Scientific Officer, Spices Research Centre, BARI, Bogura, BANGLADESH
5Principle Scientific Officer, Spices Research Sub-centre, BARI, Faridpur, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 23 July 2018; Revised received: 10 August 2018; Accepted: 18 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The experiment was conducted during April to September, 2016 at Spices Research Sub-Centre, Faridpur to evaluate the performances of four chilli lines with BARI Morich-2 as check and to select the suitable planting time during rainy season. The experimental field belongs to high land of Low Ganges River Floodplain (AEZ 12) with clay loam in texture. The experiment was laid out in RCB design with three replications. Four lines and a variety viz., C0711, C0712, C0713 and C0714 and BARI Morich-2 as check were evaluated with three planting time viz., 01April, 15 April and 30 April. Seedlings of 40 days old were transplanted maintaining of 50cm × 50cm spacing in each case. The crop (Green chilli) was started to harvest from July and completed on August-September, 2016.Among the lines, C0712 emerged as superior in terms of maximum number of fruits/plant (225.7) and weight of fruits/plant (478.6g) and fresh yield (15.43t/ha) while the highest single fruit weight (3.217 g) was found from C0714. The 15 April planting date emerged as best in terms of maximum weighed fruit (2.661g), weight of fruits/ plant (409.3 g), number of fruits/plant (182.5) and fresh yield (12.14 t/ha). The interaction effect showed that lineC0712 transplanted on 15 April gave the heavier fruits/plants (542.2 g) with maximum number of fruits/plant (241.3)and maximum fresh yield (16.73 t/ha). The 15 April planting was ideal for rainy season chilli evaluation and the line C0712 was the most stable performing line with respect to different planting dates.

Keywords: Chili (Capsicum annuum L.), Chilli lines, Performance, Planting time, Rainy season

Impact of nutrient management on the yield performance of some aromatic fine rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties in Boro season

Antora Adhikari, Md Abdur Rahman Sarkar, Swapan Kumar Paul* and Kallyan Kanty Saha
Department of Agronomy, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 02 July 2018; Revised received: 07 August 2018; Accepted: 17 August 2018

ABSTRACT
An experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Field Laboratory, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, during November 2016 to April 2017 to study the impact of nutrient management on the performance of aromatic fine rice in Boro season. The experiment comprised three varieties viz., BRRI dhan50, Basmati and BRRI dhan63; and  seven nutrient managements viz., poultry manure @ 5 t ha-1, recommended dose of chemical fertilizers (i.e. 250, 126, 120, 100 and 10 kg N-P-K-S-Zn, respectively ha-1), 25% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + poultry manure @ 2.5 t ha-1, 50% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + poultry manure @ 5 t ha-1, vermicompost @ 10 t ha-1, 25% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + vermicompost 5 t ha-1, 50% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + vermicompost @ 10 t ha-1. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The results revealed that variety, nutrient management and their interaction exerted significant influence on yield components and yield of aromatic fine rice in Boro season. The highest grain yield (4.09 t ha-1), straw yield (6.20 t ha-1) and harvest index (39.37%) were obtained in BRRI dhan63 while the lowest grain yield (3.44 t ha-1) and harvest index (36.54%) were found in Basmati.  In case of nutrient management, the highest grain yield (4.31 t ha-1) was recorded in recommended dose of chemical fertilizers (i.e. 250, 126, 120, 100 and 10 kg N-P-K-S-Zn, respectively ha-1) which was as good as 25% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + vermicompost @ 5 t ha-1and 25% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + poultry manure @ 2.5 t ha-1 while the lowest one (2.74 t ha-1) was found in vermicompost @ 10 t ha-1. In case of interaction, the highest grain yield (5.30 t ha-1) was obtained in BRRI dhan63 along with 50% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + vermicompost @ 10 t ha-1 while the highest straw yield (7.20 t ha-1) was produced in BRRI dhan63 fertilized with recommended dose of chemical fertilizers (i.e. 250, 126, 120, 100 and 10 kg N-P-K-S-Zn, respectively ha-1). Therefore, it can be concluded that BRRI dhan63 can be grown with 50% less than recommended dose of chemical fertilizer + vermicompost @10 t ha-1 in Boro season to obtain the highest grain yield.

Keywords: Aromatic fine rice, Boro season, Integrated nutrient management, Yield performance

Contamination, enrichment and translocation of heavy metals in certain leafy vegetables grown in composite effluent irrigated soil

Vinod Kumar1*, R.K. Chauhan2, Sachin Srivastava3, Jogendra Singh1 and Pankaj Kumar1
1Agro-ecology and Pollution Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology and Environmental Science, Gurukula Kangri University, Haridwar-249404 (Uttarakhand), INDIA
2Department of Chemistry, Indira Gandhi National College, Ladwa, Kurukshetra-136132 (Haryana), INDIA
3Department of Forestry, Roorkee Institute of Technology-249404 (Uttarakhand), INDIA
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 01 July 2018; Revised received: 20 August 2018; Accepted: 25 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The present investigation was carried out to determine the contamination, enrichment and translocation of heavy metals in vegetables viz., spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) grown in the composite effluent (mixture of industrial and domestic wastewater) irrigated soil. The composite effluent of Hindon River was significantly (P<0.05/P<0.01) loaded with different physical (TDS, EC), chemical (pH, BOD5, COD, Cl , TKN, PO43-, SO42-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+), heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn) and microbial  (total bacteria, total fungi, total coliform and yeast) parameters in comparison to the ground water. The composite effluent irrigation significantly (P<0.05) altered the soil characteristics like EC, pH, PO43-, K+, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the soil used for the cultivation of S. oleracea, T. foenum-graecum and C. sativum. The composite effluent irrigation significantly increased the contents of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn in the S. oleracea, T. foenum-graecum and C. sativum. The enrichment factor of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn in vegetables was recorded to be plant part specific after irrigation with composite effluent. The enrichment factor of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn were recorded in the order of Cd>Zn>Pb> Fe>Cr>Mn>Cu for S. oleracea, Cd>Zn>Fe>Mn>Pb>Cr>Cu for T. foenum-graecum and Cd>Zn>Pb>Fe>Cu>Mn>Cr for C. sativum after irrigation with composite effluent. Therefore, disposal of sewage and industrial effluents in the Hindon River must be strictly prohibited to save the existence of the Hindon River and irrigation practices using composite effluent should also be banned to prevent the possible health hazards due to consumption of contaminated vegetables.

Keywords:  Accumulation, Composite effluent, Heavy metals, Hindon River, Translocation, Vegetables crops

A lack of response of irrigated soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in rotation with cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in the Mississippi Delta, USA

H. Arnold Bruns*, Krishna N. Reddy and William T. Pettigrew
Crop Production Systems Research Unit, USDA-ARS JWDSRC Box 350, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 23 May 2018; Revised received: 02 August 2018; Accepted: 13 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The effects of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.): soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotations on the respective crops are limited. This manuscript discusses the response of irrigated soybean in crop rotation with cotton. An irrigated soybean: cotton rotation experiment was conducted from the year 2012 through 2015 near Elizabeth, MS. The crop rotation sequences were included continuous soybean (SSSS), continuous cotton (CCCC), cotton followed by soybean (SCSC), soybean followed by cotton (CSCS), soybean followed by two year of cotton (SCCS), and cotton followed by two year of soybean (CSSC). The rotations were grown under two production systems conventional and transgenetic with respect to weed control. During this study, a weed control treatment of (pendimethalin pre-emergence vs. glyphosate post-emergence) as included on the soybean plots was used. The soybean yields across rotations within a year were not significantly different. The means yields differed among years (3655.1, 3023.6, 3500.6 and 2600.3 Kg ha-1 for the year 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively) and appear related to difference in rainfall/irrigation amounts. The results revealed that the weights of 100 seed samples averaged 13.9g in the year 2015 which differed from the previous years (16.2, 15.6, and 16.2g; 2012, 2013 and 2014, respectively). Therefore, the rotations of cotton with soybean appear to have neither a beneficial or negative effect on soybean yield.

Keywords: Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), Crop rotation, Crop yield, Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]

Impact of bauxite mine to natural forest biomass and soil properties in Kas Island, Riau Island Province in Indonesia

Basuki Wasis*, Arifin and Bayu Winata
Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor 16680, West Java, INDONESIA
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected] 
Received: 26 June 2018; Revised received: 06 August 2018; Accepted: 16 August 2018

ABSTRACT
In this investigation, the impact of bauxite mine to natural forest biomass and soil properties in Kas Island, Riau Island Province in Indonesia was investigated. On the island of  Kas, bauxite mining permits have been issued. Mining activities will cause the destruction of natural forests as a source of wood, loss of flora and fauna, water regulator and medicines, besides it will also cause damage to land and the environment. Reclamation activities undertaken aimed at improving the vegetation structure and soil characteristics that undergo changes due to mine. The research method used is the analysis of vegetation and soil sampling is done by purposive sampling. Laboratory test data from physical and chemical properties of the soil, were analyzed by descriptive and statistical tests.  Bauxite mining activities have caused the loss of biomass of natural forests by 168.8 tons / ha. Revegetation activities on bauxite mining sites should be restored through planting trees of Pulcherrimum sp, Laplacea subintegerrima, Calophyllum soulatri, Thesposia populnea, Diosphyros sp, Schima wallichii and Hopea mangarawan. Bauxite mining activities cause changes in soil properties, namely a significant increase in bulk density of 0.55 (76.39%) and a significant decrease in porosity of 22.39 (30.21%), drainage pore of 6.57 (52.77%), water available at 6.41 (36.59 %), permeability is 19.59 (82.69%), C-organic is 12.20 (93.99%), N  is 0.47 (85.45%), and P  is 29.88 (85.91%). Therefore, bauxite mine activity leads to significant changes in physical properties and soil chemistry properties for bulk density parameters, porosity, drainage pores, available water, and permeability, C-organic, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) of the soil.

Keywords: Bauxite mine, Kas island, Forest biomass, Riau Island Province Indonesia, Soil properties

Effect of variety and spacing on the yield performance of maize (Zea mays L.) in old Brahmaputra floodplain area of Bangladesh

Md. Rezwanul Hasan1, Md. Rashedur Rahman1*, Ahmed Khairul Hasan1, Swapan Kumar Paul1 and A.H.M. Jahangir Alam2
1Department of Agronomy, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, BANGLADESH
2Department of Agricultural Extension (DAE), Khamarbari, Dhaka, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 02 July 2018; Revised received: 04 August 2018; Accepted: 14 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The experiments were conducted at the Agronomy Field Laboratory, Agricultural University, Mymensingh in Bangladesh during December 2015 to April 2016 to investigate the effect of variety and plant spacing on yield attributes and yield of maize. The experiment comprised of five varieties viz., Khoi bhutta, BARI hybrid maize 7, BARI hybrid maize 9, C-1921, P-3396 and five plants spacing viz., 75 cm × 20 cm, 75 cm × 25 cm, 75 cm × 30 cm, 75 cm × 35 cm and 75 cm × 40 cm. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications.  Results revealed that variety and plant spacing had significant effect on the studied crop characters and yield. The highest plant height, highest number of leaves plant-1, longest cob, maximum diameter of cob, highest number of kernel cob-1, the highest 1000-grain weight, maximum grain yield and stover yield were observed in BARI hybrid maize 7. On the other hand, the shortest plant, lowest number of cob, diameter of cob, lowest number of grains cob-1, 1000-grain weight, grain yield and stover yield were observed in Khoi bhutta. The longest plant, highest cob, maximum diameter of cob, highest number of kernel cob-1 the highest 1000-grain weight, maximum grain yield and stover yield was observed in the spacing of 75 cm × 25 cm. In contrast, the spacing of 75 cm × 30 cm produced the lowest values of the above mentioned plant parameters and also showed the lowest grain yield. In regard to interaction effect of variety and spacing, the highest plant height (232.67 cm), maximum number of cob plant-1 (1.73), maximum diameter of cob (4.60 cm), highest number of kernel cob-1 (34), maximum stover yield (12.38 t ha-1) were observed at the spacing of 75 cm × 25 cm with BARI hybrid maize 7 and resulting in the highest grain yield (9.04 t ha-1). The lowest values of the above parameters were recorded in the narrowest plant spacing of 75 cm × 35 cm with Khoi bhutta. Based on the experimental results, it may be concluded that maize (cv. BARI hybrid maize 7) can be cultivated with a spacing of 75 cm × 25 cm for appreciable grain yield.

Keywords: Old Brahmaputra floodplain, Maize varieties, Planting spacing, Yield attributes and yield

Adding benefits to phytoremediation of sugar mill effluent by growing water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes): Evaluation of biomass for biogas production

Vinod Kumar, Jogendra Singh* and Pankaj Kumar
Agro-ecology and Pollution Research Laboratory, Department of Zoology and Environmental Science, Gurukula Kangri University, Haridwar-249404 (Uttarakhand), INDIA
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 25 June 2018; Revised received: 02 August 2018; Accepted: 15 August 2018

ABSTRACT
In this experiment, we assessed the phytoremediation potential of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) for pollutants removal from sugar mill effluent amended at different concentrations and further biogas production from its grown biomass co-digested with cow dung in a laboratory scale anaerobic digester. The results showed that the maximum values of kinetic growth rate (2.56gg-1d-1), total chlorophyll content (4.10±0.10mg/gfwt.) and fresh plant biomass (393.87±4.67g/Kg) of E. crassipes were achieved in 75% concentration of sugar mill effluent after 60 days of phytoremediation experiments. Also, the enrichment factor (Ef) and bioaccumulation factor (Bf) of heavy metals were greater than or equal to 1 in the roots and leaves of E. crassipes which indicated efficient elimination of these metals from the sugar mill effluent. Significant values of cumulative biogas production (5195 ml) and predicted by modified Gompertz kinetic model (5238.71 ml) were found after 15 days of anaerobic digestion at 40°C with maximum reduction of COD (83.11%) of the substrate slurry. The plot of log(COD) vs. t (HRT) suggested good fitness of first order kinetic equation (R2= 0.9746) for reduction of co-substrate COD. The different kinetic parameters of COD reduction for biogas production viz., a, xc and k were noted as 6096.12, 7.73 and 0.26, with R2 value of 0.99, respectively. The findings of this study concluded that E. crassipes can be used for the phytoremediation of heavy metals and other pollutants most efficiently in 75% concentration of the sugar mill effluent. Additionally, the biomass of E. crassipes grown during phytoremediation can be used for
enhanced biogas production.

Keywords: Biogas production, Modified Gompertz kinetic model, Phytoremediation, Plant growth kinetics, Sugar mill effluent, Water hyacinth

Combined allelopathic effect of buckwheat and marsh pepper residues on weed management and crop performance of transplant aman rice

Farhana Afroz1, Md. Romij Uddin1*, Ahmed Khairul Hasan1, Uttam Kumer Sarker1, Mohammad Muhebbullah Ibne Hoque2 and Mohammad Akikul Islam3
1Department of Agronomy, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh-2202, BANGLADESH
2ACI Limited, Dhaka, BANGLADESH
3Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation, Kishoreganj, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
 Received: 13 August 2018; Revised received: 20 August 2018; Accepted: 25 August 2018

ABSTRACT
The experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Field Laboratory, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh during the period from June to December 2016 to evaluate the suppression of weed growth through combined application of buckwheat and marsh pepper residues in transplant aman rice. The experiment consisted of three cultivars i.e. BRRI dhan56, Binadhan-12 and Nizershail, and five different crop residues with their combination such as no residues, 2.0 t ha-1 buckwheat residues, 2.0 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues, combined 0.5 t ha-1 buckwheat and 1.0 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues, combined 1.0 t ha-1 buckwheat and 0.5 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Weed population and weed dry weight were significantly affected by cultivars and crop residues treatment. The maximum weed growth was noticed with no residues treatment and the minimum was found in combined 0.5 t ha-1 buckwheat and 1.0 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues. The grain yield as well as the yield contributing characters produced at BRRI dhan 56 was the highest among the studied varieties. The highest reduction of grain yield was obtained in no residues) treatment and the lowest was obtained when combined 0.5 t ha-1 buckwheat and 1.0 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues were applied. The highest numbers of effective tillers hill-1, number of grains panicle-1, 1000-grain weight, and grain and straw yields were observed in W3 treatment. BRRI dhan56 under 0.5 t ha-1 buckwheat and 1.0 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues treatment produced the highest grain yield. Results of this study indicates that combination of 0.5 t ha-1 buckwheat and 1.0 t ha-1 marsh pepper residues showed potentiality to suppress weed growth. Therefore, crop residues could be used as an alternative tool for sustainable weed management.

Keywords: Agricultural residues, Combined-allelopathic effect, Harvest index, Weed management, Yield efficiency

Genetic diversity analysis of some Bangladeshi aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L.) using simple sequence repeat markers (SSRM)

Md. Ashraful Islam1, Touhidur Rahman Anik2*, Mohammad Monjur Hossain3, Md. Imtiaz Uddin1 and Md. Shahabuddin Ahmed2
1Biotechnology Division, Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture (BINA), Mymensingh – 2202, BANGLADESH
2Department of Biotechnology, Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh – 2202, BANGLADESH
3Department of Agronomy, Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh – 2202, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
Received: 15 August 2018; Revised received: 23 August 2018; Accepted: 27 August 2018

ABSTRACT
In order to germplasm management, conservation, parental identification and proper utilization of aromatic rice germplasm of Bangladesh genetic diversity assessment and molecular characterization is necessary. We used ten microsatellite markers across twenty aromatic rice landraces along with four improved varieties to discriminate and characterize among them. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 8, with an average of 4.30 alleles across 10 loci. A total of 43 polymorphic alleles were detected. The values of Polymorphic information content (PIC) ranged from 0.217 to 0.835 (average 0.495) which indicate high genetic diversity among the studied aromatic rice genotypes. It was concluded by the PIC value of RM5339 that it might be the finest marker for diversity estimation and characterize of these aromatic rice genotypes, followed by RM334, RM414 and RM28502 markers. The UPGMA cluster dendrogram constructed in this study identified seven clusters with a correlation coefficient 0.874. Molecular characterization of aromatic rice landraces of Bangladesh exhibited large variations among the genotypes. Five rice genotypes namely BRRI dhan38, BRRI dhan50, Bashmoti safed, Malaysira, Khas-kani showed highest genetic dissimilarity among the studied rice genotypes. The findings of this study would be useful for background selection in backcross breeding programs for aromatic rice improvement as well as identification of genetically distant and genetically close accessions for maintenance and conservation.

Keywords: Aromatic rice, Breeding, Cluster analysis, Genetic diversity, SSR marker

Shelf life and quality of Sorboti lemon as affected by different chemicals and storage temperature

E. Kayesh1*, S. Das1, M.S. Roni1, M.M.R. Rajib1, M.M. Islam2 and H. Sultana1
1Department of Horticulture, 2Department of Agronomy, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahaman Agricultural University, Salna, Gaipur-1706, BANGLADESH
*Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
 Received: 13 August 2018; Revised received: 22 August 2018; Accepted: 26 August 2018

ABSTRACT
A laboratory experiment was conducted with different chemicals and storage temperature (Kinetin + 4°C, kinetin + 15°C, kinetin + 25°C, potash alum + 4°C, potash alum + 15°C, potash alum + 25°C, hot water + 4°C, hot water + 15°C, hot water + 25°C, without treatment + 4°C, without treatment + 15°C and without treatment + 25°C) at the department of Horticulture of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahaman Agricultural University during June to December 2017. The aim was the study to find out the suitable method to increase shelf life of Sorboti lemon. During storage fruit decay, weight loss and total soluble solid (TSS) increased. While juice content, ascorbic acid content decreased with the increase in storage temperature. Minimum fruit decay (50%) was recorded up to 70 Days after storage (DAS) at 4°C in hot water treatment and fruit decayed (90%) at 4°C was recorded up to 70 DAS in Kinetin treatment. Minimum loss of fruit weight was recorded at 4°C (7.10% and 11.95%) at 70 DAS when stored in hot water and kinetin, respectively. Maximum juice content (50.11%) after 70 DAS at 4°C in hot water treatment which was followed by Kinetin treatment storage at 4°C (40.10%). The TSS was found almost static at 70 days after storage but ascorbic acid content decreased (59.59 mg/100ml to 43.36 mg/100ml and 63.10 mg/100 ml to 49.11 mg/100ml) from its initial content in hot water and kinetin at 4°C temperature. At 15°C temperature, it can only possible up to 35 days. So, considering fruit decay, weight loss, TSS and juice content lemon could be stored up to 70 DAS at 4°C both under hot water and kinetin treatment. Storing can be done in 35 DAS at 15°C both hot water and kinetin treatment.

Keywords: Kinetin treatment, Maximum juice content, Minimum fruit decay, Shelf life, Storage temperature, Sorboti lemon

Impact of integrated nutrient management on vegetative growth and flowering quality of gladiolus (Gladiolus hybridus Hort.) cv. American Beauty

Manish Kumar Meena1*, Rahul Kumar Byadwal1, Manoj Kumar Meena2 Anil Kumar Sharma1 and J.P. Rathore3
1Department of Floriculture and Landscaping, 2Department of Vegetable Science, College of Horticulture and Forestry, Agriculture University, Kota, Jhalawar – 326 023 (Rajasthan), INDIA
3Division of fruit Science, FOH, SKUAST- Kashmir, Shalimar-190025 (J&K), INDIA
 *Corresponding author’s E-mail: [email protected]
 Received: 15 August 2018; Revised received: 24 August 2018; Accepted: 27 August 2018

ABSTRACT
A field study on ‘effects of integrated nutrient management on vegetative growth and flowering quality of gladiolus (Gladiolus hybridus Hort.) cv. American Beauty’ was carried out at College of Horticulture and Forestry, Jhalawar during 2016-17. It was found that cv. American Beauty with treatment the tallest plants (121.50 cm), maximum number of leaves per plant (9.03), the maximum  leaf length (38.20 cm), earliest spike emergence (59.22 days), minimum number of days to floret opening (12.50 days), maximum number of florets per spike (17.53), maximum spike length (108.50 cm), maximum floret diameter (9.01 cm), maximum rachis length (39.03 cm) was found in T12 (RDF 75% + Azotobacter + PSB + Mycorrhiza). The maximum stem diameter (1.52 cm) and maximum spike girth (0.97 cm) was recorded in T10 (RDF 75% + PSB + Mycorrhiza). On the basis of foregoing summary, the results may be concluded as follow: The different bio-fertilizer treatments had significant influence on the vegetative growth, flowering and post-harvest of gladiolus in the present study. Application of bio fertilizer singly and in different combinations has significant effect on all the vegetative, floral and corms parameters. Therefore, among various bio fertilizers and their combinations, Azotobacter, PSB and Myccorhiza were found the best, followed by un-inoculated treatment show least value for these parameters during the seasons of experiment.

Keywords: Azotobacter, Gladiolus (Gladiolus hybridus Hort.), Growth and Flowering, Mycorrhiza, Phosphorus solubilizing bacteria (PSB), Recommended dose fertilizer (RDF)